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developed a deep love for baltimore city and a true understanding how baltimore works. bailey became a creative genius at promoting and highlighting the many achievements of the city under mayor schaefer. before mayor schaefer left city hall, he nominated bailey to serve as president of the baltimore city school board. in that role she helped parents and a navigate the school bureaucracy, suggested workable solutions for teachers and brought a commonsense approach to the baltimore city school system. but bailey's knowledge and expertise goes beyond knowing how government works. she has had her pulse on baltimore and on maryland. she knows the key players this the city and state, many on a personal level. for many years bailey has been the go-to person when people need to get things done. without a doubt she has been an invaluable resource to my entire staff, to me and the people of maryland. but she is also a tireless advocate and a voice for families and individuals who may not have had the understanding or resources to access the services they need. what whether it's working with t
the world come and my point is this. whether you are in baltimore brazil, kansas city or cairo, that our young men and women with desire and potential to build a bright future, to work on business and social innovations that can unleash an new wave of opportunity and economic growth. for this generation, the internet is a primary platform for innovation, where their future is being invented. my experience has convinced me that we are at a crossroads. the threats are real. but nothing i've seen has shaken my optimism. working hard and working together, i'm convinced that we can turn back the threats and ensure that all people benefit from the amazing opportunities of the internet and that we can, as newt minow taught us, harness new communications technologies to help deliver a future of prosperity and peace. thank you. [applause] >> terrific. thank you very much, chairman genachowski. and also want to thank you on behalf of my company, ibm. you sustained a really constructive dialogue with my chairman and ceo, both new and old one, over the years in the administration. thank you very muc
was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced and was 10 feet, governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable when we had five years, hurricane wind, we had, you know, massive flooding and you look at the city's shut down of the stock exchanges we start to get a sense of the scale and scope and yet the networks perform. i've read dozens of stories the last couple of weeks have many consumers there are only a link to information, the only tied to any sort of affirmation or people with through their smartphone, so while there was obviously an impact on the sites the networks performed really pretty well. >> some networks did well, some did less well, but we don't really have sought the information about those because there are no reporting requirements on these networks. there are no standards by which we measure the performance and it's entirely voluntary whether they want to put to the cutoff to the fcc or not to talk to the state and local government or not. i think they will work for it but they responded well into the anecdotally heard some of these
storms of the city has ever faced and the tidal surge, previous high was 10 feet for the storm. it was 14. governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. we had fires. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding. we had snow. if you look at that and look at the flooding in the the subway systems that the shutdown of the stock exchanges. you start to get the sense a massive scale and scope of this storm. and yet the networks performed. i mean, i've read dozens of stories over the last couple of weeks about how for many consumers their only link to information, their only tie to any sort of information or to people was through their smartphone. linking social media and their smartphone. so while there was an impact on cell sites, i think the networks performed really, really pretty well spent by a assessment here is some networks did well, some networks did less well. but we don't really have solid information about this because there are no reporting requirements of these networks. there are no standards by which we measure their performance, and it's entirely v
and chancellor of the new york city public schools joel kline had a somewhat on education reform in washington examining america's education system and the impact on national security. council on foreign relations moderates the discussion, about an hour. >> welcome to this evening, broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament to two things. one is how the education reform has ripened, a combination of meade, the talent we see in this room has coalesced on the issue of new technologies but there is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i am a great believer that two things matter in life. won his ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change, the real driver of history. when you unpack it all and jeb bush is a perfect example. the coming together of a person with real talent and drive with a set of ideas and this is one of them. the fact that you are all here is the greatest salute you could give. condoleezza rice and i come out of a national security background. we use to mess around with something called the ra
happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do you mean? >> what i mean, and this goes back, it's really a continuation of the same thing.
and help in reducing portability. human well-being, intercultural interaction and sustainable cities. all of these things are embracing the entire spectrum of discipline. so it is shortsighted to the humanities. >> i guess i have to say that this is a particularly enlightening panel here. but when you look at what is going on at many public universities, particularly public regional universities, maybe not flagships, but institution after institution that announces that we are going to be an international university, but then they eliminate half of their offerings. and we will have room for the occasional philosopher and some of these projects, but we just don't see it. we get all the strategic plans and you don't see them included. we have also touched on the roles of the faculty. tenure adjunct and then there is that issue with some of you touched on your events questions how do you manage the university to encourage talent and also attract new talent. what you see as the personnel policy related to this that need bolstering are changing? >> i think it starts with how you define your bu
" to tony. i want to add one other person, marca bristow. the leading disability advocate in the city of chicago. this wonderful young woman was tireless in her wheelchair wheeling from office to office begging members and their staffs to consider voting for this. if and when we pass this, i am going to remember marca, tony and certainly senator dole for all their work. when the senate ratifies the treaty, we can be proud that our friends and families and courageous veterans will enjoy the same access that they have come to expect here in the united states. i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cardin: mr. president, i take this time to urge my colleagues to vote for the ratification of the convention of the rights of persons with disabilities. i have the honor of serving on the senate foreign rel
of the infrastructure at the same time. former president reagan frequently talked about america as a city on a hill, a shining example for the world of a nation that ensures opportunity and freedom for all its people. thanks to our country's success in implementing the a.d.a., advancing that law's great goals of full inclusion and full participation, america indeed has become a shining city on a hill for people with disabilities around the globe. by ratifying the crpd, we can affirm our leadership in this field. we can give renewed impetus to those striving to emulate us. we can give them that renewed emphasis by our example and by sitting down with them and working with them, only if we are a signatory to this treaty. and again, you think about american exceptionalism. america, we are a pretty exceptional country when you think about it, in many ways. we're not just exceptional because we have the most tanks, guns and bombs and things like that. but we are exceptional in terms of what we have done for civil rights and human rights and to include all in our family. our family being our citizenship.
condoleezza rice, former chancellor of the newark city public school joel klein. that will be online at c-span.org. we do have more live coverage coming up today on the c-span networks. at 10 a.m. on c-span former senators trent lott and byron dorgan will lead a discussion on u.s. energy policy. at the national press club. the leaders are currently co-chairs of the bipartisan policy center's energy project. topics will include development and domestic gas and oil production, energy security threats and environmental challenges. that would be like at 10 a.m. eastern again on our companion network c-span. at 11:30 a.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just ov
the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced and the tidal surge, previous high was 10 feet. for this storm it was 14. governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. i mean we have fires. we had hurricane force winds. we had you know, massive flooding. we had speed of snow to get a to get a look at that and and lucas but into the subway system and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start getting sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. and yet the networks perform. i mean i've read dozens of stories over the last couple of weeks about how for many consumers their only link to information, their only tie to any sort of information or to people is through their smartphone linking social media and their smartphone. so while there was an impact on cell sites i think the networks perform really, really pretty well spent my assessment here is some networks did well some networks did less well but we don't really have solid information about this be
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11